Phytodermatitis Slides 11 through 15

Reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Please note that the slides are very large JPEG files that will take up to 6.5 minutes to view or download using a 28.8 kbps modem.

Phytophotodermatitis

Skin reactions are caused by furocoumarin chemicals in the plant and exposure to Ultraviolet A sunlight. Blisters form in a few hours after contact with the plant and sunlight. Hyperpigmented skin develops in the affected area after the blisters have healed and may last for months.

Slide 11

Severe lime dermatitis in a bartender mixing drinks and working in the sunlight (NIOSH collection).

Lime oil phytophotodermatitis

Return to Phytodermatitis Index or Dermatitis Educational Material.

Slide 12

Blisters developed after exposure to wild parsnip and sunlight.

Wild parsnip phytophotodermatitis

Return to Phytodermatitis Index or Dermatitis Educational Material.

Slide 13

Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) is one of the most common causes of phytophotodermatitis.

Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa)

Return to Phytodermatitis Index or Dermatitis Educational Material.

Slide 14

Bishop's weed (Ammi majus).

Bishop's weed (Ammi majus)

Return to Phytodermatitis Index or Dermatitis Educational Material.

Slide 15

Queen Anne's lace (Daucus carota).

Queen Anne's lace (Daucus carota)

Return to Phytodermatitis Index or Dermatitis Educational Material.

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