General Occupational Health Standards

Table of Contents



Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite, and Actinolite
Chapter 296-62 WAC, Part I-1

WAC

296-62-077  Asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite, and actinolite.
296-62-07701  Scope and application.
296-62-07703  Definitions.
296-62-07705  Permissible exposure limits (PELs).
296-62-07706  Multi-employer worksites.
296-62-07709  Exposure assessment and monitoring.
296-62-07711  Regulated areas.
296-62-07712  Requirements for asbestos activities in construction and shipyard work.
296-62-07713  Methods of compliance for asbestos activities in general industry.
296-62-07715  Respiratory protection.
296-62-07717  Protective work clothing and equipment.
296-62-07719  Hygiene facilities and practices.
296-62-07721  Communication of hazards to employees.
296-62-07722  Employee information and training.
296-62-07723  Housekeeping.
296-62-07725  Medical surveillance.
296-62-07727  Recordkeeping.
296-62-07728  Competent person.
296-62-07733  Appendices.
296-62-07735  Appendix A-WISHA reference method-Mandatory.
296-62-07737  Appendix B-Detailed procedures for asbestos sampling and analysis-Nonmandatory.
296-62-07741  Appendix D-Medical questionnaires-Mandatory.
296-62-07743  Appendix E-Interpretation and classification of chest roentgenograms-Mandatory.
296-62-07745  Appendix F-Work practices and engineering controls for automotive brake and clutch inspection, disassembly, repair and assembly-Mandatory.
296-62-07747  Appendix G-Substance technical information for asbestos-Nonmandatory.
296-62-07749  Appendix H-Medical surveillance guidelines for asbestos-Nonmandatory.
296-62-07751  Appendix I-Work practice and engineering controls for Class I asbestos operations-Nonmandatory.
296-62-07753  Appendix J-Polaraized light microscopy of asbestos-Nonmandatory.
296-62-07755  Appendix K-Smoking cessation program information for asbestos, tremolite, anthopyhyllite, and actinolite-Nonmandatory.

WAC 296-62-077 Asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite, and actinolite.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.050(2) and 49.17.040. 87-10-008 (Order 87-06), 296-62-077, filed 4/27/87.]

WAC 296-62-07701 Scope and application.

(1) WAC 296-62-07701 through 296-62-07753 applies to all occupational exposures to asbestos in all industries covered by chapter 49.17 RCW, Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act and chapter 49.26 RCW, Health and Safety--Asbestos.

(2) This part applies to construction work as defined in WAC 296-155-012 except for work involving asbestos-containing asphalt roof coatings, cements, and mastics. The exception for roofing materials does not apply to asphalt coated asbestos felting and similar built-up roofing.

(3) This part applies to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking employments and related employments as defined in WAC 296-304-01001 except for work involving asbestos-containing asphalt roof coatings, cements, and mastics. The exception for roofing materials does not apply to asphalt coated asbestos felting and similar built-up roofing.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, .050, RCW 49.26.040 and RCW 49.26.130. 99-17-026 (Order 98-35), 296-62-07701, filed 08/10/99, effective 11/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-01-079, 296-62-07701, filed 12/17/96, effective 3/1/97. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 87-24-051 (Order 87-24), 296-62-07701, filed 11/30/87. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.050(2) and 49.17.040. 87-10-008 (Order 87-06), 296-62-07701, filed 4/27/87.]

WAC 296-62-07703 Definitions.

For the purpose of WAC 296-62-07701 through 296-62-07753:

Accredited inspector means any person meeting the accreditation requirements of the Federal Toxic Substance Control Act, Section 206(a)(1) and (3). 15 U.S.C. 2646(a)(1) and (3).

Aggressive method means removal or disturbance of building material by sanding, abrading, grinding or other method that breaks, crumbles, or disintegrates intact ACM.

Amended water means water to which surfactant (wetting agent) has been added to increase the ability of the liquid to penetrate ACM.

Asbestos includes chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite asbestos, anthophyllite asbestos, actinolite asbestos, and any of these minerals that have been chemically treated and/or altered.

For purposes of this standard, “asbestos” includes PACM, as defined below.

Asbestos abatement project means an asbestos project involving three square feet or three linear feet, or more, of asbestos-containing material.

Asbestos-containing material (ACM) means any material containing more than 1% asbestos.

Asbestos project - includes the construction, demolition, repair, remodeling, maintenance or renovation of any public or private building or structure, mechanical piping equipment or system involving the demolition, removal, encapsulation, salvage, or disposal of material or outdoor activity releasing or likely to release asbestos fibers into the air.

Authorized person means any person authorized by the employer and required by work duties to be present in regulated areas.

Building/facility/vessel owner means any legal entity or person who owns any public or private building, vessel, structure, facility, or mechanical system or the remnants thereof, including the agent of such person, but does not include individuals who work on asbestos projects in their own single-family residences, no part of which is used for commercial purposes. Also included is any lessee, who exercises control over management and recordkeeping functions relating to a building, vessel, and/or facility in which activities covered by this standard takes place.

Certified asbestos supervisor means an individual certified by the department under WAC 296-65-012.

Certified asbestos worker means an individual certified by the department under WAC 296-65-010.

Certified industrial hygienist (CIH) means one certified in the practice of industrial hygiene by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene.

Class I asbestos work means activities involving the removal of thermal system insulation or surfacing ACM/PACM.

Class II asbestos work means activities involving the removal of ACM which is not thermal system insulation or surfacing material. This includes, but is not limited to, the removal of asbestos-containing wallboard, floor tile and sheeting, roofing and siding shingles, and construction mastics.

Class III asbestos work means repair and maintenance operations where “ACM,” including TSI and surfacing ACM and PACM, may be disturbed.

Class IV asbestos work means maintenance and custodial activities during which employees contact but do not disturb ACM or PACM and activities to clean up dust, waste and debris resulting from Class I, II, and III activities.

Clean room means an uncontaminated room having facilities for the storage of employees' street clothing and uncontaminated materials and equipment.

Closely resemble means that the major workplace conditions which have contributed to the levels of historic asbestos exposure, are no more protective than conditions of the current workplace.

Competent person means, in addition to the definition in WAC 296-62-07728, one who is capable of identifying existing asbestos, hazards in the workplace and selecting the appropriate control strategy for asbestos exposure, who has the authority to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them as specified in WAC 296-62-07728. The competent person shall be certified as an asbestos supervisor in compliance with WAC 296-65-030(3) and 296-65-012 for Class I and Class II work, and for Class III and Class IV work involving 3 square feet or 3 linear feet or more of asbestos-containing material. For Class III and Class IV work, involving less than 3 square feet or 3 linear feet, the competent person shall be trained in an operations and maintenance (O&M) course which meets the criteria of EPA (40 CFR 763.92(a)(2)).

Critical barrier means one or more layers of plastic sealed over all openings into a work area or any other similarly placed physical barrier sufficient to prevent airborne asbestos in a work area from migrating to an adjacent area.

Decontamination area means an enclosed area adjacent and connected to the regulated area and consisting of an equipment room, shower area, and clean room, which is used for the decontamination of workers, materials, and equipment contaminated with asbestos.

Demolition means the wrecking or taking out of any load-supporting structural member and any related razing, removing, or stripping of asbestos products. Where feasible, asbestos-containing materials shall be removed from all structures prior to the commencement of any demolition activity as per WAC 296-155-775(9).

Department means the department of Labor & Industries.

Director means the director of the department of Labor & Industries or his/her authorized representative.

Director of NIOSH means the Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or designee.

Disturb or disturbance refers to activities that disrupt the matrix of ACM or PACM, crumble or pulverize ACM or PACM, or generate visible debris from ACM or PACM. This term includes activities that disrupt the matrix of ACM or PACM, render ACM or PACM friable, or generate visible debris. Disturbance includes cutting away small amounts of ACM or PACM, no greater than the amount that can be contained in one standard size glove bag or waste bag in order to access a building or vessel component. In no event shall the amount of ACM or PACM so disturbed exceed that which can be contained in one glove bag or waste bag which shall not exceed 60 inches in length and width.

Employee exposure means that exposure to airborne asbestos that would occur if the employee were not using respiratory protective equipment.

Equipment room (change room) means a contaminated room located within the decontamination area that is supplied with impermeable bags or containers for the disposal of contaminated protective clothing and equipment.

Fiber means a particulate form of asbestos, five micrometers or longer, with a length-to-diameter ratio of at least three to one.

Glove bag means not more than a 60 x 60 inch impervious plastic bag-like enclosure affixed around an asbestos-containing material, with glove-like appendages through which material and tools may be handled.

High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter means a filter capable of trapping and retaining at least 99.97 percent of all monodispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers mean aerodynamic diameter or larger.

Homogeneous area means an area of surfacing material or thermal system insulation that is uniform in color and texture.

Industrial hygienist means a professional qualified by education, training, and experience to anticipate, recognize, evaluate and develop controls for occupational health hazards.

Intact means that the ACM has not crumbled, been pulverized, or otherwise deteriorated so that the asbestos is no longer likely to be bound with its matrix. Friable ACM that is disturbed, as defined in this part, is presumed to be no longer intact.

Modification for the purpose of WAC 296-62-07712 means a changed or altered procedure, material or component of a control system, which replaces a procedure, material or component of a required system. Omitting a procedure or component, or reducing or diminishing the stringency or strength of a material or component of the control system is not a “modification” for the purposes of WAC 296-62-07712.

Negative initial exposure assessment means a demonstration by the employer (which complies with the criteria in WAC 296-62-07709) that employee exposure during an operation is expected to be consistently below the PELs.

PACM means “presumed asbestos-containing material.”

Presumed asbestos-containing material means thermal system insulation and surfacing material found in buildings, vessels, and vessel sections constructed no later than 1980. The designation of a material as “PACM” may be rebutted pursuant to WAC 296-62-07721.

Project designer means a person who has successfully completed the training requirements for an abatement project designer established by 40 U.S.C. 763.90(g).

Regulated area means an area established by the employer to demarcate areas where Class I, II, and III asbestos work is conducted, and any adjoining area where debris and waste from such asbestos work accumulate; and a work area within which airborne concentrations of asbestos, exceed or can reasonably be expected to exceed the permissible exposure limit. Requirements for regulated areas are set out in WAC 296-62-07711.

Removal means all operations where ACM and/or PACM is taken out or stripped from structures or substrates, and includes demolition operations.

Renovation means the modifying of any existing vessel, vessel section, structure, or portion thereof.

Repair means overhauling, rebuilding, reconstructing, or reconditioning of vessels, vessel sections, structures or substrates, including encapsulation or other repair of ACM or PACM attached to vessels, vessel sections, structures or substrates.

Surfacing material means material that is sprayed, troweled-on or otherwise applied to surfaces (such as acoustical plaster on ceilings and fireproofing materials on structural members, or other materials on surfaces for acoustical, fireproofing, and other purposes).

Surfacing ACM means surfacing material which contains more than 1% asbestos.

Thermal system insulation (TSI) means ACM applied to pipes, fittings, boilers, breaching, tanks, ducts, or other structural components to prevent heat loss or gain.

Thermal system insulation ACM is thermal system insulation which contains more than 1% asbestos.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, .050, RCW 49.26.040 and RCW 49.26.130. 99-17-026 (Order 98-35), 296-62-07703, filed 08/10/99, effective 11/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-01-079, 296-62-07703, filed 12/17/96, effective 3/1/97. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 89-21-018 (Order 89-10), 296-62-07703, filed 10/10/89, effective 11/24/89; 89-11-035 (Order 89-03), 296-62-07703, filed 5/15/89, effective 6/30/89; 87-24-051 (Order 87-24), 296-62-07703, filed 11/30/87. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.050(2) and 49.17.040. 87-10-008 (Order 87-06), 296-62-07703, filed 4/27/87.]

 

WAC 296-62-07705 Permissible exposure limits (PEL).

(1) Time weighted average (TWA). The employer shall ensure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of asbestos in excess of 0.1 fiber per cubic centimeter (0.1 f/cc) of air as an eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) as determined by the method prescribed in Appendix A of this part, or by an equivalent method recognized by the department.

(2) Excursion limit. The employer shall ensure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of asbestos in excess of 1.0 fiber per cubic centimeter of air (1 f/cc) as averaged over a sampling period of thirty minutes, as determined by the method prescribed in Appendix A of this part, or by an equivalent method recognized by the department.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-01-079, 296-62-07705, filed 12/17/96, effective 3/1/97. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 89-11-035 (Order 89-03), 296-62-07705, filed 5/15/89, effective 6/30/89; 87-24-051 (Order 87-24), 296-62-07705, filed 11/30/87. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.050(2) and 49.17.040. 87-10-008 (Order 87-06), 296-62-07705, filed 4/27/87.]

WAC 296-62-07706 Multi-employer worksites.

(1) On multi-employer worksites, an employer performing work requiring the establishment of a regulated area shall inform other employers on the site of the nature of the employer's work with asbestos and/or PACM, of the existence of and requirements pertaining to regulated areas, and the measures taken to ensure that employees of such other employers are not exposed to asbestos.

(2) Asbestos hazards at a multi-employer worksite shall be abated by the employer who created or controls the source of asbestos contamination. For example, if there is a significant breach of an enclosure containing Class I work, the employer responsible for erecting the enclosure shall repair the breach immediately.

(3) In addition, all employers of employees exposed to asbestos hazards shall comply with applicable protective provisions to protect their employees. For example, if employees working immediately adjacent to a Class I asbestos job are exposed to asbestos due to the inadequate containment of such jobs, their employer shall either remove the employees from the area until the enclosure breach is repaired; or perform an initial exposure assessment pursuant to WAC 296-62-07709.

(4) All employers of employees working adjacent to regulated areas established by another employer on a multi-employer worksite, shall take steps on a daily basis to ascertain the integrity of the enclosure and/or the effectiveness of the control method relied on by the primary asbestos contractor to assure that asbestos fibers do not migrate to such adjacent areas.

(5) All general contractors on a construction project which includes work covered by this standard shall be deemed to exercise general supervisory authority over the work covered by this standard, even though the general contractor is not qualified to serve as the asbestos “competent person” as defined by WAC 296-62-07703. As supervisor of the entire project, the general contractor shall ascertain whether the asbestos contractor is in compliance with this standard, and shall require such contractor to come into compliance with this standard when necessary.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-01-079, 296-62-07706, filed 12/17/96, effective 3/1/97. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 94-16-145, 296-62-07706, filed 8/3/94, effective 9/12/94; 87-24-051 (Order 87-24), 296-62-07706, filed 11/30/87.]

WAC 296-62-07709 Exposure assessment and monitoring.

(1) General monitoring criteria.

(a) Each employer who has a workplace or work operation where exposure monitoring is required under this part must perform monitoring to determine accurately the airborne concentrations of asbestos to which employees may be exposed.

(b) Determinations of employee exposure must be made from breathing zone air samples that are representative of the eight-hour TWA and thirty minute short-term exposures of each employee.

(c) Representative eight-hour TWA employee exposures must be determined on the basis of one or more samples representing full-shift exposure for each shift for each employee in each job classification in each work area.

(d) Representative thirty minute short-term employee exposures must be determined on the basis of one or more samples representing thirty minute exposures associated with operations that are most likely to produce exposures above the excursion limit for each shift for each job classification in each work area.

(2) Exposure monitoring requirements for all occupational exposures to asbestos in all industries covered by the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act except construction work, as defined in WAC 296-155-012, and except ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking employments and related employments as defined in WAC 296-304-01001.

(a) Initial monitoring.

(i) Each employer who has a workplace or work operation covered by this standard, except as provided for in (a)(ii) and (iii) of this subsection, must perform initial monitoring of employees who are, or may reasonably be expected to be exposed to airborne concentrations at or above the TWA permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit. The initial monitoring must be at the initiation of each asbestos job to accurately determine the airborne concentration of asbestos to which employees may be exposed.

(ii) Where the employer or his/her representative has monitored after March 31, 1992, for the TWA permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit, and the monitoring satisfies all other requirements of this section, and the monitoring data was obtained during work operations conducted under workplace conditions closely resembling the processes, type of material including percentage of asbestos, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions used and prevailing in the employer's current operations, the employer may rely on such earlier monitoring results to satisfy the requirements of (a)(i) of this subsection.

(iii) Where the employer has relied upon objective data that demonstrates that asbestos is not capable of being released in airborne concentrations at or above the TWA permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit under those work conditions of processing, use, or handling expected to have the greatest potential for releasing asbestos, then no initial monitoring is required.

(b) Monitoring frequency (periodic monitoring) and patterns. After the initial determinations required by subsection (2)(a)(i) of this section, samples must be of such frequency and pattern as to represent with reasonable accuracy the levels of exposure of the employees. Sampling must not be at intervals greater than six months for employees whose exposures may reasonably be foreseen to exceed the TWA permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit.

(c) Daily monitoring within regulated areas: The employer must conduct daily monitoring that is representative of the exposure of each employee who is assigned to work within a regulated area. Exception: When all employees within a regulated area are equipped with full facepiece supplied-air respirators operated in the pressure-demand mode equipped with either an auxiliary positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus or a HEPA filter, the employer may dispense with the daily monitoring required by this subsection.

(d) Changes in monitoring frequency. If either the initial or the periodic monitoring required by subsection (2)(a) and (b) of this section statistically indicates that employee exposures are below the TWA permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit, the employer may discontinue the monitoring for those employees whose exposures are represented by such monitoring.

(e) Additional monitoring. Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (2)(a)(ii) and (c) of this section, the employer must institute the exposure monitoring required under subsection (2)(a)(i) and (ii) of this section whenever there has been a change in the production, process, control equipment, personnel, or work practices that may result in new or additional exposures above the TWA permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit, or when the employer has any reason to suspect that a change may result in new or additional exposures above the TWA permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit.

(3) Exposure assessment monitoring requirements for all construction work as defined in WAC 296-155-012 and for all ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking employments and related employments as defined in WAC 296-304-01001.

(a) Initial exposure assessment.

(i) Each employer who has a workplace or work operation covered by this standard must ensure that a “competent person” conducts an exposure assessment immediately before or at the initiation of the operation to ascertain expected exposures during that operation or workplace. The assessment must be completed in time to comply with the requirements which are triggered by exposure data or lack of a “negative exposure assessment,” and to provide information necessary to assure that all control systems planned are appropriate for that operation and will work properly.

(ii) Basis of initial exposure assessment: Unless a negative exposure assessment has been made according to (b) of this subsection, the initial exposure assessment must, if feasible, be based on monitoring conducted according to (b) of this subsection. The assessment must take into consideration both the monitoring results and all observations, information or calculations which indicate employee exposure to asbestos, including any previous monitoring conducted in the workplace, or of the operations of the employer which indicate the levels of airborne asbestos likely to be encountered on the job. For Class I asbestos work, until the employer conducts exposure monitoring and documents that employees on that job will not be exposed in excess of the PELs, or otherwise makes a negative exposure assessment according to (b) of this subsection, the employer must presume that employees are exposed in excess of the TWA and excursion limit.

(b) Negative exposure assessment: For any one specific asbestos job which will be performed by employees who have been trained in compliance with the standard, the employer may demonstrate that employee exposures will be below the PELs by data which conform to the following criteria:

(i) Objective data demonstrating that the products or material containing asbestos minerals or the activity involving such product or material cannot release airborne fibers in concentrations exceeding the TWA and excursion limit under those work conditions having the greatest potential for releasing asbestos; or

(ii) Where the employer has monitored prior asbestos jobs for the PEL and the excursion limit within 12 months of the current or projected job, the monitoring and analysis were performed in compliance with the asbestos standard in effect; and the data was obtained during work operations conducted under workplace conditions “closely resembling” the processes, type of material including percentage of asbestos, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions used and prevailing in the employer's current operations, the operations were conducted by employees whose training and experience are no more extensive than that of employees performing the current job, and these data show that under the conditions prevailing and which will prevail in the current workplace there is a high degree of certainty that employee exposures will not exceed the TWA or excursion limit; or

(iii) The results of initial exposure monitoring of the current job made from breathing zone samples that are representative of the 8-hour TWA and 30-minute short-term exposures of each employee covering operations which are most likely during the performance of the entire asbestos job to result in exposures over the PELs.

(c) Periodic monitoring.

(i) Class I and Class II operations. The employer must conduct daily monitoring that is representative of the exposure of each employee who is assigned to work within a regulated area who is performing Class I or II work, unless the employer according to (b) of this subsection, has made a negative exposure assessment for the entire operation.

(ii) All operations under the standard other than Class I and II operations. The employer must conduct periodic monitoring of all work where exposures are expected to exceed a PEL, at intervals sufficient to document the validity of the exposure prediction.

(iii) Exception. When all employees required to be monitored daily are equipped with supplied-air respirators operated in the pressure demand mode, the employer may dispense with the daily monitoring required by subsection (2)(c) of this section. However, employees performing Class I work using a control method which is not listed in WAC 296-62-07712 or using a modification of a listed control method, must continue to be monitored daily even if they are equipped with supplied-air respirators.

(d) Termination of monitoring. If the periodic monitoring required by (c) of this subsection reveals that employee exposures, as indicated by statistically reliable measurements, are below the permissible exposure limit and excursion limit the employer may discontinue monitoring for those employees whose exposures are represented by such monitoring.

(e) Monitoring outside negative-pressure enclosures: The employer must conduct representative area monitoring of the airborne fiber levels at least every other day at the HEPA machine exhaust and entrance to the decontamination area.

(f) Additional monitoring. Notwithstanding the provisions of (b), (c), and (d) of this subsection, the employer must institute the exposure monitoring required under (c) of this subsection whenever there has been a change in process, control equipment, personnel or work practices that may result in new or additional exposures above the permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit or when the employer has any reason to suspect that a change may result in new or additional exposures above the permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit. Such additional monitoring is required regardless of whether a “negative exposure assessment” was previously produced for a specific job.

(g) Preabatement monitoring. Prior to the start of asbestos work, respresentative area monitoring must be conducted for comparison to clearance monitoring as required by subsection (3)(h) of this section. Preabatement air monitoring is not required for outdoor work.

(h) Clearance monitoring. Representative area air monitoring must be taken at the completion of the asbestos work. Air sample results must be obtained before removal or reoccupancy of the regulated area. Clearance air monitoring is not required for outdoor asbestos work. The employer must demonstrate by monitoring that the airborne concentration is below:

The permissible exposure limit; or

At or below the airborne fiber level existing prior to the start of the asbestos work, whichever level is lower.

(4) Method of monitoring.

(a) All samples taken to satisfy the employee exposure monitoring requirements of this section must be personal samples collected following the procedures specified in WAC 296-62-07735, Appendix A.

(b) Monitoring must be performed by persons having a thorough understanding of monitoring principles and procedures and who can demonstrate proficiency in sampling techniques.

(c) All samples taken to satisfy the monitoring requirements of this section must be evaluated using the WISHA reference method specified in WAC 296-62-07735, Appendix A, or an equivalent counting method recognized by the department.

(d) If an equivalent method to the WISHA reference method is used, the employer must ensure that the method meets the following criteria:

(i) Replicate exposure data used to establish equivalency are collected in side-by-side field and laboratory comparisons; and

(ii) The comparison indicates that ninety percent of the samples collected in the range 0.5 to 2.0 times the permissible limit have an accuracy range of plus or minus twenty-five percent of the WISHA reference method results at a ninety-five percent confidence level as demonstrated by a statistically valid protocol; and

(iii) The equivalent method is documented and the results of the comparison testing are maintained.

(e) To satisfy the monitoring requirements of this section, employers must use the results of monitoring analysis performed by laboratories which have instituted quality assurance programs that include the elements as prescribed in WAC 296-62-07735, Appendix A.

(5) Employee notification of monitoring results.

(a) The employer must, as soon as possible but no later than within five days for construction and shipyard industries and fifteen working days for other industries, after the receipt of the results of any monitoring performed under the standard, notify the affected employees of these results in writing either individually or by posting of results in an appropriate location that is accessible to affected employees.

(b) The written notification required by (a) of this subsection must contain the corrective action being taken by the employer to reduce employee exposure to or below the TWA and/or excursion exposure limits, wherever monitoring results indicated that the TWA and/or excursion exposure limits had been exceeded.

(6) Observation of monitoring.

(a) The employer must provide affected employees or their designated representatives an opportunity to observe any monitoring of employee exposure to asbestos conducted in accordance with this section.

(b) When observation of the monitoring of employee exposure to asbestos requires entry into an area where the use of protective clothing or equipment is required, the observer must be provided with and be required to use such clothing and equipment and shall comply with all other applicable safety and health procedures.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, .040, .050, and .060. 06-05-027 (Order 05-45), § 296-62-07709, filed 02/07/06, effective 04/01/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, .040, .050 and RCW 49.26.130. 00-06-075 (Order 99-40), 296-62-07709, filed 03/01/00, effective 04/10/00. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, .050, RCW 49.26.040 and RCW 49.26.130. 99-17-026 (Order 98-35), 296-62-07709, filed 08/10/99, effective 11/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-01-079, 296-62-07709, filed 12/17/96, effective 3/1/97. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 89-11-035 (Order 89-03), 296-62-07709, filed 5/15/89, effective 6/30/89; 87-24-051 (Order 87-24), 296-62-07709, filed 11/30/87. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.050(2) and 49.17.040. 87-10-008 (Order 87-06), 296-62-07709, filed 4/27/87.]

 

WAC 296-62-07711 Regulated areas.

(1) General. The employer shall establish a regulated area in work areas where airborne concentrations of asbestos exceed or can reasonably be expected to exceed the permissible exposure limits prescribed in WAC 296-62-07705. All Class I, II and III asbestos work shall be conducted within regulated areas. All other operations covered by this standard shall be conducted within the regulated area where airborne concentrations of asbestos exceed or can reasonably be expected to exceed permissible exposure limits. Regulated areas shall comply with the requirements of subsections (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), and (8) of this section.

(2) Demarcation. The regulated area shall be demarcated in any manner that minimizes the number of persons within the area and protects persons outside the area from exposure to airborne asbestos. Where critical barriers or negative pressure enclosures are used, they may demarcate the regulated area. Signs shall be provided and displayed pursuant to the requirements of WAC 296-62-07721.

(3) Access. Access to regulated areas shall be limited to authorized persons or to persons authorized by the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act or regulations issued pursuant thereto.

(4) Provision of respirators. Each person entering a regulated area where employees are required in WAC 296-62-07715(1) to wear respirators shall be supplied with and required to use a respirator, selected in accordance with WAC 296-62-07715(2).

(5) Protective clothing. All persons entering a regulated area shall be supplied with and required to wear protective clothing, selected in accordance with WAC 296-62-07717.

(6) Prohibited activities. The employer shall ensure that employees do not eat, drink, smoke, chew tobacco or gum, or apply cosmetics in the regulated areas.

(7) Permit-required confined space. The employer shall determine if a permit-required confined space hazard exists and shall take any necessary precautions in accordance with chapter 296-62 WAC Part M.

(8) Competent persons. For construction and shipyard work the employer shall ensure that all asbestos work performed within regulated areas is supervised by a competent person, as defined in WAC 296-62-07703. The duties of the competent person are set out in WAC 296-62-07728.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-19-014, 296-62-07711, filed 9/5/97, effective 11/5/97. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-01-079, 296-62-07711, filed 12/17/96, effective 3/1/97. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 95-04-007, 296-62-07711, filed 1/18/95, effective 3/1/95; 93-19-142 (Order 93-04), 296-62-07711, filed 9/22/93, effective 11/1/93; 89-11-035 (Order 89-03), 296-62-07711, filed 5/15/89, effective 6/30/89; 87-24-051 (Order 87-24), 296-62-07711, filed 11/30/87. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.050(2) and 49.17.040. 87-10-008 (Order 87-06), 296-62-07711, filed 4/27/87.]

WAC 296-62-07712 Requirements for asbestos activities in construction and shipyard work.

(1) Methods of compliance, the following engineering controls and work practices of this section must be used for construction work defined in WAC 296-155-012 and for all ship repair defined in WAC 296-304-010.

(2) Engineering controls and work practices for all operations covered by this section. The employer must use the following engineering controls and work practices in all operations covered by this section, regardless of the levels of exposure:

(a) Vacuum cleaners equipped with HEPA filters to collect all debris and dust containing ACM and PACM, except as provided in subsection (10)(b) of this section in the case of roofing material.

(b) Wet methods, or wetting agents, to control employee exposures during asbestos handling, mixing, removal, cutting, application, and cleanup, except where employers demonstrate that the use of wet methods is infeasible due to, for example, the creation of electrical hazards, equipment malfunction, and, in roofing, except as provided in subsection (10)(b) of this section.

(c) Asbestos must be handled, mixed, applied, removed, cut, scored, or otherwise worked in a wet saturated state to prevent the emission of airborne fibers unless the usefulness of the product would be diminished thereby.

(d) Prompt cleanup and disposal of wastes and debris contaminated with asbestos in leak-tight containers except in roofing operations, where the procedures specified in this section apply.

(3) In addition to the requirements of subsection (2) of this section, the employer must use the following control methods to achieve compliance with the TWA permissible exposure limit and excursion limit prescribed by WAC 296-62-07705:

(a) Local exhaust ventilation equipped with HEPA filter dust collection systems;

(b) Enclosure or isolation of processes producing asbestos dust;

(c) Ventilation of the regulated area to move contaminated air away from the breathing zone of employees and toward a filtration or collection device equipped with a HEPA filter;

(d) Use of other work practices and engineering controls that the department can show to be feasible;

(e) Wherever the feasible engineering and work practice controls described above are not sufficient to reduce employee exposure to or below the permissible exposure limit and/or excursion limit prescribed in WAC 296-62-07705, the employer must use them to reduce employee exposure to the lowest levels attainable by these controls and must supplement them by the use of respiratory protection that complies with the requirements of WAC 296-62-07715.

(4) Prohibitions. The following work practices and engineering controls must not be used for work related to asbestos or for work which disturbs ACM or PACM, regardless of measured levels of asbestos exposure or the results of initial exposure assessments:

(a) High-speed abrasive disc saws that are not equipped with point or cut ventilator or enclosures with HEPA filtered exhaust air;

(b) Compressed air used to remove asbestos, or materials containing asbestos, unless the compressed air is used in conjunction with an enclosed ventilation system designed to capture the dust cloud created by the compressed air;

(c) Dry sweeping, shoveling or other dry cleanup of dust and debris containing ACM and PACM;

(d) Employee rotation as a means of reducing employee exposure to asbestos.

(5) Cleanup.

(a) After completion of asbestos work (removal, demolition, and renovation operations), all surfaces in and around the work area must be cleared of any asbestos debris.

(b) Encapsulant must be applied to all areas where asbestos has been removed to ensure binding of any remaining fibers.

(6) Class I requirements. The following engineering controls and work practices and procedures must be used:

(a) All Class I work, including the installation and operation of the control system must be supervised by a competent person as defined in WAC 296-62-07703;

(b) For all Class I jobs involving the removal of more than 25 linear or 10 square feet of thermal system insulation or surfacing material; for all other Class I jobs, where the employer cannot produce a negative exposure assessment according to WAC 296-62-07709(3), or where employees are working in areas adjacent to the regulated area, while the Class I work is being performed, the employer must use one of the following methods to ensure that airborne asbestos does not migrate from the regulated area:

(i) Critical barriers must be placed over all the openings to the regulated area, except where activities are performed outdoors; or

(ii) The employer must use another barrier or isolation method which prevents the migration of airborne asbestos from the regulated area, as verified by perimeter area surveillance during each work shift at each boundary of the regulated area, showing no visible asbestos dust; and perimeter area monitoring showing that clearance levels contained in 40 CFR Part 763, Subpart E, of the EPA Asbestos in Schools Rule are met, or that perimeter area levels, measured by Phase Contrast Microscopy (PCM) are no more than background levels representing the same area before the asbestos work began. The results of such monitoring must be made known to the employer no later than 24 hours from the end of the work shift represented by such monitoring. Exception: For work completed outdoors where employees are not working in areas adjacent to the regulated areas, (a) of this subsection is satisfied when the specific control methods in subsection (7) of this section are used;

(c) For all Class I jobs, HVAC systems must be isolated in the regulated area by sealing with a double layer of 6 mil plastic or the equivalent;

(d) For all Class I jobs, impermeable dropcloths shall be placed on surfaces beneath all removal activity;

(e) For all Class I jobs, all objects within the regulated area must be covered with impermeable dropcloths or plastic sheeting which is secured by duct tape or an equivalent;

(f) For all Class I jobs where the employer cannot produce a negative exposure assessment, or where exposure monitoring shows that a PEL is exceeded, the employer must ventilate the regulated area to move contaminated air away from the breathing zone of employees toward a HEPA filtration or collection device.

(7) Specific control methods for Class I work. In addition, Class I asbestos work must be performed using one or more of the following control methods according to the limitations stated below:

(a) Negative pressure enclosure (NPE) systems: NPE systems may be used where the configuration of the work area does not make the erection of the enclosure infeasible, with the following specifications and work practices:

(i) Specifications:

(A) The negative pressure enclosure (NPE) may be of any configuration;

(B) At least 4 air changes per hour must be maintained in the NPE;

(C) A minimum of -0.02 column inches of water pressure differential, relative to outside pressure, must be maintained within the NPE as evidenced by manometric measurements;

(D) The NPE must be kept under negative pressure throughout the period of its use; and

(E) Air movement must be directed away from employees performing asbestos work within the enclosure, and toward a HEPA filtration or collection device.

(ii) Work practices:

(A) Before beginning work within the enclosure and at the beginning of each shift, the NPE must be inspected for breaches and smoke-tested for leaks, and any leaks sealed.

(B) Electrical circuits in the enclosure must be deactivated, unless equipped with ground-fault circuit interrupters.

(b) Glove bag systems may be used to remove PACM and/or ACM from straight runs of piping and elbows and other connections with the following specifications and work practices:

(i) Specifications:

(A) Glove bags must be made of 6 mil thick plastic and must be seamless at the bottom.

(B) Glove bags used on elbows and other connections must be designed for that purpose and used without modifications.

(ii) Work practices:

(A) Each glove bag must be installed so that it completely covers the circumference of pipe or other structure where the work is to be done.

(B) Glove bags must be smoke-tested for leaks and any leaks sealed prior to use.

(C) Glove bags may be used only once and may not be moved.

(D) Glove bags must not be used on surfaces whose temperature exceeds 150oF.

(E) Prior to disposal, glove bags must be collapsed by removing air within them using a HEPA vacuum.

(F) Before beginning the operation, loose and friable material adjacent to the glove bag/box operation must be wrapped and sealed in two layers of six mil plastic or otherwise rendered intact.

(G) Where system uses attached waste bag, such bag must be connected to collection bag using hose or other material which must withstand pressure of ACM waste and water without losing its integrity.

(H) Sliding valve or other device must separate waste bag from hose to ensure no exposure when waste bag is disconnected.

(I) At least two persons must perform Class I glove bag removal operations.

(c) Negative pressure glove bag systems. Negative pressure glove bag systems may be used to remove ACM or PACM from piping.

(i) Specifications: In addition to specifications for glove bag systems above, negative pressure glove bag systems must attach HEPA vacuum systems or other devices to bag during removal.

(ii) Work practices:

(A) The employer must comply with the work practices for glove bag systems in this section.

(B) The HEPA vacuum cleaner or other device used during removal must run continually during the operation until it is completed at which time the bag must be collapsed prior to removal of the bag from the pipe.

(C) Where a separate waste bag is used along with a collection bag and discarded after one use, the collection bag may be reused if rinsed clean with amended water before reuse.

(d) Negative pressure glove box systems: Negative pressure glove boxes may be used to remove ACM or PACM from pipe runs with the following specifications and work practices:

(i) Specifications:

(A) Glove boxes must be constructed with rigid sides and made from metal or other material which can withstand the weight of the ACM and PACM and water used during removal.

(B) A negative pressure generator must be used to create negative pressure in the system.

(C) An air filtration unit must be attached to the box.

(D) The box must be fitted with gloved apertures.

(E) An aperture at the base of the box must serve as a bagging outlet for waste ACM and water.

(F) A back-up generator must be present on site.

(G) Waste bags must consist of 6 mil thick plastic double-bagged before they are filled or plastic thicker than 6 mil.

(ii) Work practices:

(A) At least two persons must perform the removal.

(B) The box must be smoke-tested for leaks and any leaks sealed prior to each use.

(C) Loose or damaged ACM adjacent to the box must be wrapped and sealed in two layers of 6 mil plastic prior to the job, or otherwise made intact prior to the job.

(D) A HEPA filtration system must be used to maintain pressure barrier in box.

(e) Water spray process system. A water spray process system may be used for removal of ACM and PACM from cold line piping if, employees carrying out such process have completed a 40-hour separate training course in its use, in addition to training required for employees performing Class I work. The system must meet the following specifications and shall be performed by employees using the following work practices:

(i) Specifications:

(A) Piping must be surrounded on 3 sides by rigid framing.

(B) A 360 degree water spray, delivered through nozzles supplied by a high pressure separate water line, must be formed around the piping.

(C) The spray must collide to form a fine aerosol which provides a liquid barrier between workers and the ACM and PACM.

(ii) Work practices:

(A) The system must be run for at least 10 minutes before removal begins.

(B) All removal must take place within the water barrier.

(C) The system must be operated by at least three persons, one of whom must not perform removal, but must check equipment, and ensure proper operation of the system.

(D) After removal, the ACM and PACM must be bagged while still inside the water barrier.

(f) A small walk-in enclosure which accommodates no more than two persons (mini-enclosure) may be used if the disturbance or removal can be completely contained by the enclosure with the following specifications and work practices:

(i) Specifications:

(A) The fabricated or job-made enclosure must be constructed of 6 mil plastic or equivalent.

(B) The enclosure must be placed under negative pressure by means of a HEPA filtered vacuum or similar ventilation unit.

(C) Change room. A small change room made of 6-mil-thick polyethylene plastic should be contiguous to the mini-enclosure, and is necessary to allow the worker to vacuum off his/her protective coveralls and remove them before leaving the work area. While inside the enclosure, the worker should wear Tyvek disposable coveralls or equivalent and must use the appropriate HEPA-filtered dual cartridge respiratory protection. The advantages of mini-enclosures are that they limit the spread of asbestos contamination, reduce the potential exposure of bystanders and other workers who may be working in adjacent areas, and are quick and easy to install. The disadvantage of mini-enclosures is that they may be too small to contain the equipment necessary to create a negative-pressure within the enclosure; however, the double layer of plastic sheeting will serve to restrict the release of asbestos fibers to the area outside the enclosure.

(ii) Work practices:

(A) Before use, the mini-enclosure must be inspected for leaks and smoke-tested to detect breaches, and any breaches sealed.

(B) Before reuse, the interior must be completely washed with amended water and HEPA-vacuumed.

(C) During use, air movement must be directed away from the employee's breathing zone within the mini-enclosure.

(8) Alternative control methods for Class I work. Class I work may be performed using a control method which is not referenced in subsection (2)(a) through (3)(e) of this section, or which modifies a control method referenced in subsection (2)(a) through (3)(e) of this section, if the following provisions are complied with:

(a) The control method shall enclose, contain or isolate the processes or source of airborne asbestos dust, before it enters the breathing zone of employees.

(b) A certified industrial hygienist or licensed professional engineer who is also qualified as a project designer as defined in WAC 296-62-07703, shall evaluate the work area, the projected work practices and the engineering controls and shall certify in writing that the planned control method is adequate to reduce direct and indirect employee exposure to below the PELs under worst-case conditions of use, and that the planned control method will prevent asbestos contamination outside the regulated area, as measured by clearance sampling which meets the requirements of EPA's Asbestos in Schools rule issued under AHERA, or perimeter monitoring which meets the criteria in subsection (6)(b)(ii) of this section. Where the TSI or surfacing material to be removed is 25 linear or 10 square feet or less, the evaluation required in subsection (8)(b) of this section may be performed by a competent person.

(c) Before work which involves the removal of more than 25 linear or 10 square feet of thermal system insulation or surfacing material is begun using an alternative method which has been the subject of subsection (2)(a) through (3)(e) of this section required evaluation and certification, the employer shall include a copy of such evaluation and certification with notifications required by WAC 296-65-020, Notification requirements. The submission shall not constitute approval by WISHA.

(d) The evaluation of employee exposure required in WAC 296-62-07712(8) must include and be based on sampling and analytical data representing employee exposure during the use of such method under the worst-case conditions and by employees whose training and experiences are equivalent to employees who are to perform the current job.

(9) Work practices and engineering controls for Class II work.

(a) All Class II work must be supervised by a competent person as defined in WAC 296-62-07703.

(b) For all indoor Class II jobs, where the employer has not produced a negative exposure assessment according to WAC 296-62-07709(3), or where during the job, changed conditions indicate there may be exposure above the PEL or where the employer does not remove the ACM in a substantially intact state, the employer must use one of the following methods to ensure that airborne asbestos does not migrate from the regulated area:

(i) Critical barriers must be placed over all openings to the regulated area; or

(ii) The employer must use another barrier or isolation method which prevents the migration of airborne asbestos from the regulated area, as verified by perimeter area monitoring or clearance monitoring which meets the criteria set out in subsection (6)(b)(ii) of this section.

(c) Impermeable dropcloths must be placed on surfaces beneath all removal activity.

(d) All Class II asbestos work must be performed using the work practices and requirements set out above in subsection (2) of this section.

(10) Additional controls for Class II work. Class II asbestos work must also be performed by complying with the work practices and controls designated for each type of asbestos work to be performed, set out in this paragraph. Where more than one control method may be used for a type of asbestos work, the employer may choose one or a combination of designated control methods. Class II work also may be performed using a method allowed for Class I work, except that glove bags and glove boxes are allowed if they fully enclose the Class II material to be removed.

(a) For removing vinyl and asphalt flooring materials which contain ACM or for which in buildings constructed no later than 1980, the employer has not verified the absence of ACM according to WAC 296-62-07712 (10)(a)(ix). The employer must ensure that employees comply with the following work practices and that employees are trained in these practices according to WAC 296-62-07722.

(i) Flooring or its backing must not be sanded.

(ii) Vacuums equipped with HEPA filter, disposable dust bag, and metal floor tool (no brush) must be used to clean floors.

(iii) Resilient sheeting must be removed by cutting with wetting of the snip point and wetting during delamination. Rip-up of resilient sheet floor material is prohibited.

(iv) All scraping of residual adhesive and/or backing must be performed using wet methods.

(v) Dry sweeping is prohibited.

(vi) Mechanical chipping is prohibited unless performed in a negative pressure enclosure which meets the requirements of subsection (7)(a) of this section.

(vii) Tiles must be removed intact, unless the employer demonstrates that intact removal is not possible.

(viii) When tiles are heated and can be removed intact, wetting may be omitted.

(ix) Resilient flooring material including associated mastic and backing must be assumed to be asbestos-containing unless an industrial hygienist determines that it is asbestos-free using recognized analytical techniques.

(b) For removing roofing material which contains ACM the employer must ensure that the following work practices are followed:

(i) Roofing material must be removed in an intact state to the extent feasible.

(ii) Wet methods must be used to remove roofing materials that are not intact, or that will be rendered not intact during removal, unless such wet methods are not feasible or will create safety hazards.

(iii) Cutting machines must be continuously misted during use, unless a competent person determines that misting substantially decreases worker safety.

(iv) When removing built-up roofs with asbestos-containing roofing felts and an aggregate surface using a power roof cutter, all dust resulting from the cutting operation must be collected by a HEPA dust collector, or must be HEPA vacuumed by vacuuming along the cut line. When removing built-up roofs with asbestos-containing roofing felts and a smooth surface using a power roof cutter, the dust resulting from the cutting operation must be collected either by a HEPA dust collector or HEPA vacuuming along the cut line, or by gently sweeping and then carefully and completely wiping up the still wet dust and debris left along the cut line. The dust and debris must be immediately bagged or placed in covered containers.

(v) Asbestos-containing material that has been removed from a roof must not be dropped or thrown to the ground. Unless the material is carried or passed to the ground by hand, it must be lowered to the ground via covered, dust-tight chute, crane or hoist:

(A) Any ACM that is not intact must be lowered to the ground as soon as is practicable, but in any event no later than the end of the work shift. While the material remains on the roof it must either be kept wet, placed in an impermeable waste bag, or wrapped in plastic sheeting.

(B) Intact ACM must be lowered to the ground as soon as is practicable, but in any event no later than the end of the work shift.

(vi) Upon being lowered, unwrapped material must be transferred to a closed receptacle in such manner so as to preclude the dispersion of dust.

(vii) Roof level heating and ventilation air intake sources shall be isolated or the ventilation system must be shut down.

(viii) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, removal or repair of sections of intact roofing less than 25 square feet in area does not require use of wet methods or HEPA vacuuming as long as manual methods which do not render the material nonintact are used to remove the material and no visible dust is created by the removal method used. In determining whether a job involves less than 25 square feet, the employer must include all removal and repair work performed on the same roof on the same day.

(c) When removing cementitious asbestos-containing siding and shingles or transite panels containing ACM on building exteriors (other than roofs, where subsection (10)(b) of this section applies) the employer must ensure that the following work practices are followed:

(i) Cutting, abrading or breaking siding, shingles, or transite panels, must be prohibited unless the employer can demonstrate that methods less likely to result in asbestos fiber release cannot be used.

(ii) Each panel or shingle must be sprayed with amended water prior to removal.

(iii) Unwrapped or unbagged panels or shingles must be immediately lowered to the ground via covered dust-tight chute, crane or hoist, or placed in an impervious waste bag or wrapped in plastic sheeting and lowered to the ground no later than the end of the work shift.

(iv) Nails must be cut with flat, sharp instruments.

(d) When removing gaskets containing ACM, the employer must ensure that the following work practices are followed:

(i) If a gasket is visibly deteriorated and unlikely to be removed intact, removal must be undertaken within a glove bag as described in subsection (7)(b) of this section.

(ii) (Reserved.)

(iii) The gasket must be immediately placed in a disposal container.

(iv) Any scraping to remove residue must be performed wet.

(e) When performing any other Class II removal of asbestos-containing material for which specific controls have not been listed in subsection (10) of this section, the employer must ensure that the following work practices are complied with.

(i) The material must be thoroughly wetted with amended water prior to and during its removal.

(ii) The material must be removed in an intact state unless the employer demonstrates that intact removal is not possible.

(iii) Cutting, abrading or breaking the material must be prohibited unless the employer can demonstrate that methods less likely to result in asbestos fiber release are not feasible.

(iv) Asbestos-containing material removed, must be immediately bagged or wrapped, or kept wet until transferred to a closed receptacle, no later than the end of the work shift.

(f) Alternative work practices and controls. Instead of the work practices and controls listed in subsection (10) of this section, the employer may use different or modified engineering and work practice controls if the following provisions are complied with.

(i) The employer must demonstrate by data representing employee exposure during the use of such method under conditions which closely resemble the conditions under which the method is to be used, that employee exposure will not exceed the PELs under any anticipated circumstances.

(ii) A competent person must evaluate the work area, the projected work practices and the engineering controls, and must certify in writing, that the different or modified controls are adequate to reduce direct and indirect employee exposure to below the PELs under all expected conditions of use and that the method meets the requirements of this standard. The evaluation must include and be based on data representing employee exposure during the use of such method under conditions which closely resemble the conditions under which the method is to be used for the current job, and by employees whose training and experience are equivalent to employees who are to perform the current job.

(11) Work practices and engineering controls for Class III asbestos work. Class III asbestos work must be conducted using engineering and work practice controls which minimize the exposure to employees performing the asbestos work and to bystander employees.

(a) The work must be performed using wet methods.

(b) To the extent feasible, the work must be performed using local exhaust ventilation.

(c) Where the disturbance involves drilling, cutting, abrading, sanding, chipping, braking, or sawing of thermal system insulation or surfacing material, the employer must use impermeable dropcloths, and must isolate the operation using mini-enclosures or glove bag systems according to subsection (7) of this section or another isolation method.

(d) Where the employer does not produce a “negative exposure assessment” for a job, or where monitoring results show the PEL has been exceeded, the employer must contain the area using impermeable dropcloths and plastic barriers or their equivalent, or must isolate the operation using a control system listed in and in compliance with subsection (7) of this section.

(e) Employees performing Class III jobs, which involve the disturbance of thermal system insulation or surfacing material, or where the employer does not produce a “negative exposure assessment” or where monitoring results show a PEL has been exceeded, must wear respirators which are selected, used and fitted according to provisions of WAC 296-62-07715.

(12) Class IV asbestos work. Class IV asbestos jobs must be conducted by employees trained according to the asbestos awareness training program set out in WAC 296-62-07722. In addition, all Class IV jobs must be conducted in conformity with the requirements set out in this section, mandating wet methods, HEPA vacuums, and prompt clean up of debris containing ACM and PACM.

(a) Employees cleaning up debris and waste in a regulated area where respirators are required must wear respirators which are selected, used and fitted according to provisions of WAC 296-62-07715.

(b) Employers of employees who clean up waste and debris in, and employers in control of, areas where friable thermal system insulation or surfacing material is accessible, must assume that such waste and debris contain asbestos.

(13) Alternative methods of compliance for installation, removal, repair, and maintenance of certain roofing and pipeline coating materials. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, an employer who complies with all provisions of subsection (10)(a) and (b) of this section when installing, removing, repairing, or maintaining intact pipeline asphaltic wrap, or roof flashings which contain asbestos fibers encapsulated or coated by bituminous or resinous compounds will be deemed to be in compliance with this section. If an employer does not comply with all provisions of this subsection (13), or if during the course of the job the material does not remain intact, the provisions of subsection (10) of this section apply instead of this subsection (13).

(a) Before work begins and as needed during the job, a competent person who is capable of identifying asbestos hazards in the workplace and selecting the appropriate control strategy for asbestos exposure, and who has the authority to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate such hazards, must conduct an inspection of the worksite and determine that the roofing material is intact and will likely remain intact.

(b) All employees performing work covered by this subsection (13) must be trained in a training program that meets the requirements of WAC 296-62-07722.

(c) The material must not be sanded, abraded, or ground. When manual methods are used, materials must stay intact.

(d) Material that has been removed from a roof must not be dropped or thrown to the ground. Unless the material is carried or passed to the ground by hand, it must be lowered to the ground via covered, dust-tight chute, crane or hoist. All such material must be removed from the roof as soon as is practicable, but in any event no later than the end of the work shift.

(e) Where roofing products which have been labeled as containing asbestos pursuant to WAC 296-62-07721, installed on nonresidential roofs during operations covered by this subsection (13), the employer must notify the building owner of the presence and location of such materials no later than the end of the job.

(f) All removal or disturbance of pipeline asphaltic wrap must be performed using wet methods.

[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, .040, .050, and .060. 06-05-027 (Order 05-45), § 296-62-07712, filed 02/07/06, effective 04/01/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, .050, RCW 49.26.040 and RCW 49.26.130. 99-17-026 (Order 98-35), 296-62-07712, filed 08/10/99, effective 11/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.040, [49.17.]050 and [49.17.]060. 97-19-014, 296-62-07712, filed 9/5/97, effective 11/5/97; 97-01-079, 296-62-07712, filed 12/17/96, effective 3/1/97. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. 89-21-018 (Order 89-10), 296-62-07712, filed 10/10/89, effective 11/24/89; 89-11-035 (Order 89-03), 296-62-07712, filed 5/15/89, effective 6/30/89; 87-24-051 (Order 87-24), 296-62-07712, filed 11/30/87.]

296-62 Part I-1 (Continued)

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